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Supreme Court has split verdict on immigration law

Tuesday, June 26, 2012 - 01:37

June 25 - The U.S. Supreme Court upheld the most controversial part of Arizona's law that allows police to check the immigration status of people stopped or arrested, but struck down three other provisions. Sarah Irwin reports.

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The U.S. Supreme Court delivers a split verdict on Arizona's controversial immigration law on Monday. With a 8-0 vote, the justices ruled police checks do not interfere with the federal government's ability to carry out immigration policy. But, critics say the checks lead to racial profiling. Marielena Hincapie is with the National Immigration Law Center. (SOUNDBITE) Marielena Hincapie of the National Immigration Law Center: "We believe that this is a decision that does set back civil rights." The Court sided with the Obama administration - who challenged the law in court - that Arizona went too far with the other three provisions. These provisions required immigrants to carry papers all the time - banned immigrants from soliciting work in public places - and allowed police to arrest immigrants without warrants if they were believed to have committed a crime making them deportable. Arizona Governor Jan Brewer said the court upheld the "heart" of the law. SOUNDBITE: Arizona Governor Jan Brewer "I think the Court upheld the ability of the local government to assist the federal government in immigration laws." With about 11.5 million illegal immigrants in the United States - immigration and border security will be a likely hot button issue in the upcoming presidential election. Sarah Irwin, Reuters.

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Supreme Court has split verdict on immigration law

Tuesday, June 26, 2012 - 01:37