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Spanish voters try to break political deadlock

Sunday, June 26, 2016 - 01:17

Spanish voters hope to break the political deadlock that resulted after an election last December failed to give any one party a majority in Parliament. Diane Hodges reports.

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Spanish voters are back at the polls, six months after the country's political parties failed to form a government in December elections. At the time, four large parties and six regional ones had split the vote, leaving no one party with enough support to form a government. This voter in Madrid doesn't expect Sunday's voting to be any different. (SOUNDBITE) (Spanish) ZACARIAS, VOTER IN MADRID, SAYING; "More or less the same as last time - difficult to reach an accord, and if it's impossible we'll have to do it all over again." In theory, the emerging anti-austerity party, Podemos, COULD secure the 176 parliamentary seats needed to form a government… largely through an alliance with the Socialists and support from smaller regional parties. A leftist coalition could deliver a fresh jolt to Europe's political mainstream, after Britain voted to leave the European Union. (SOUNDBITE) (Spanish) IGNACIO CALDERON, VOTER IN MADRID, SAYING; "It's a very important day because things are complicated enough in Spain and Europe, and the result will certainly influence the economy and the situation in the country." Podemos leader Pablo Iglesias is calling for a re-launch of the European Union based on improved democracy, social protection and solidarity.

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Spanish voters try to break political deadlock

Sunday, June 26, 2016 - 01:17